DESIGN BOX

“Should I become a registered architect?”

In each state and territory of Australia, it is a legal requirement that any person using the title ‘architect’ or offering services to the public as an architect, must be registered with the Architects’ Board in that jurisdiction
— Architects Accreditation Council of Australia
Pictured: Kiril Petrov (left) and Patrick Smardon (right)

Pictured: Kiril Petrov (left) and Patrick Smardon (right)

While there are many benefits and career opportunities when progressing from a graduate of architecture to a registered architect, frequent tales of a frightful process that is both long and tedious can be enough to make any graduate think twice.

So to find out what it is really like, we sat down with two of our newest registered architects, Patrick Smardon and Kiril Petrov to find out about their experiences through the process.

Q: What motivated you to take become a registered architect?

Patrick: “It was about finishing what I started when I began architecture at university. Becoming a graduate of architecture did not feel like I had fully achieved what I began, but now becoming registered does have that feeling of completion.”

Kiril: “The biggest motivator was the support Guymer Bailey Architects provided and the Practicing Architecture (PARC) course I attended. This really helped me get through.”

Q: Is the exam process as intensive as they make out?

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Patrick: The exam is serious, but those of us from the office that undertook it participated in a night course to prepare for it. Having done the preparation, the exam is not as bad as it is made out to be.

Kiril: “There is a lot to read and absorb in a relatively short time. I think this can be very difficult if you have not experienced things first hand. I have been putting the registration off for a while until I felt I have the right kind of experience.”

Q: What do you think are the greatest benefits of being a registered architect?

Patrick: “The pay rise...no…well yes that’s great, but being registered was that next step in my growth for the past two years. Now that I have reached that target I can pick a new target so that I can continue to grow and develop.”

Kiril: “It’s the natural progression and final step to be able to use the title Architect and not have ‘graduate’ next your name anymore.”

Q: What was the most challenging part of the registration process?

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Patrick: “Many people say the interview, but well, mine was mostly talking about myself, and I have no issue talking about myself! I think the most difficult part was waiting for the results. They really know how to make you wait.”

Kiril: ”This will likely differ from person to person. Some find the actual paper quite difficult, while others find the interview very daunting. The written exam was particularly difficult this year. For me, the interview went pretty well.”

Q: What advice would you give those who are contemplating whether or not they want to become a registered architect?

Patrick: “First, do it; and second, undertake a preparation course. I undertook the Practicing Architecture (PARC) course. They do a fantastic job not only preparing you for the exam but preparing you to become a confident architect in day-to-day work life.”

Kiril: “It is vital to be exposed to a variety of projects, contract types and have the opportunity to be involved with a project from conception right to completion of defects. Only then you appreciate the theory and things start to click in terms of real practice.”

Brisbane Art Show Recap

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The GBA Brisbane Studio came alive in a burst of colour for our annual Brisbane Pop Up Art Show fundraiser for Hear and Say that was held on LOUD Shirt Day, a national community initiative to raise funds so that children affected by hearing loss can live life loudly.

The annual community event showcased an incredible range of artwork created by the GBA Brisbane team and incredible local artists that included calligraphy, drawings, paintings, prints, photography, collage, glass, jewellery, sculptures and watercolours.

The art, along with live music, cheese and wine and a very special junk jam musical item from the team kept guests entertained as we raised $2,800 on the night for Hear and Say.

Phil Jackson, Director of Guymer Bailey Architects, said the Annual Art show is a proud tradition which has been running for six years.

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“Hear and Say is a wonderful not-for-profit organisation that assists children and young adults who experience hearing loss. The Annual Art show has been a proud tradition of ours to help raise much-needed funds for Hear and Say, so children and families can continue to get the highest standard of clinical care.”
— Phil Jackson, Director of Guymer Bailey Architects

Jim Green from Hear and Say who attended the event said,

“Hear and Say were delighted to be the beneficiaries of the 2018 Guymer Bailey Art Show. This unique Loud Shirt Day event is now into its sixth year and provides the perfect excuse to get dressed up in your best and brightest to support children who are deaf or hard of hearing. We would like to thank the team at Guymer Bailey and all the artists and attendees whose magnificent support has raised much-needed funds to give the gifts of sound and speech to children with hearing loss.”
— Jim Green, Hear and Say

Of course, a night like this doesn’t happen without some amazing and generous sponsors! We would like to thank the following businesses who donated our fantastic raffle prizes:

  • Corporate Information Systems (CIS) - Samsung Galaxy Tab A 8" with Toshiba 32GB MicroSD card

  • ARCPANEL - Weekend Getaway to Noosa

  • BRITEX - 2 x Premium Broncos tickets to any game and a $150 restaurant card

  • Webforge - Grandfather Solera Rare Tawny Port 20 years

  • Bondor - $100 Dymocks voucher

  • ALSPEC - $100 Indooroopilly voucher

  • CASF Surfaces - $100 BWS voucher

  • POLYFLOR - $100 Myer voucher

  • AWS - $50 Event Cinemas voucher and $50 Restaurant Choice voucher

  • KINGSPAN - $100 Gift voucher

  • ALLEGION - Schlage Sense Deadbolt

  • GWA - Clark Shower Screen Hook and a Pinot Noir

  • mLIGHT - Gourmet food hamper

  • Light and Design Group - Champagne and chocolates

Also, thanks to Zip Water for providing a shiny new Zip Hydro Tap! We can now enjoy sparkling water on tap and were able to provide our guests with a ‘plastic bottle free’ zone.

Even if you missed the Art Show, you can still donate! Click here to help children and young adults who are experiencing hearing loss continue to get the highest standard of clinical care.

For more images from our Brisbane Art Show head to our Facebook page.

Designing California Lane

California Lane is an exciting new laneway precinct that has opened behind popular Brunswick Street in Fortitude Valley, Brisbane. The laneway, which is an extension of the Bakery Lane and Winn Lane developments, aptly incorporates retro elements from the nostalgic years of California.

With plans for California Lane started in 2013 by Guymer Bailey Architects, to celebrate the completion of this great new Brisbane addition we thought we would chat with Arthur Apostolos, from the family behind the Lanes, and talk about their vision and the design journey of California Lane.

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The inspiration

What was the inspiration behind the design of California Lane?

“With California Lane, we wanted to add to our existing laneways that include Bakery Lane and Winn Lane and create a laneway with its own point of difference that would blend the heritage of the existing buildings with the context and history of the laneway.

In this case, the context was that our father owned the California Café, once located at Carroll’s Corner in Brunswick Street. He took it over in 1961 and had it for 45 years. This became the inspiration behind the design and the name of the laneway.”

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The vision

What is your vision for the laneways?

“The laneways have been designed to represent the greater context of Brisbane, in that it’s a place where you can be yourself. The Valley has always been a place for everyone, rich or poor, successful or not successful, creative or not creative, the Valley has never distinguished between a type of person, and the laneways are the same.

We’re not targeting a specific demographic; anyone can go there who enjoys what’s on offer and what’s on offer is something Brisbane hasn’t had until now, a place where small independent retailers that are Brisbane unique can do business in a distinctively Queensland heritage setting.”

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The design

California Lane had quite the design evolution from where it started, how has it changed?

“California Lane was originally scheduled for construction at the same time as Bakery Lane; however, it was pushed back as Bakery Lane became quite a large project. As a result, the design naturally evolved over this time.

We moved away from the initial civic culvert and shipping container concept and settled on a traditional structure in the shape of a container to be in line with the 1960s theme. The Valley was in its heyday during the 1950’s, and 1960’s, so we wanted to borrow aspects that captured that era in colours, materials, features and finishes as well as in the tenancies that run down the lane.

The civic culverts that originally featured on one side of the laneway were stripped back to create an alfresco area for tenants, allowing customers to linger and enjoy the nostalgic atmosphere of California Lane with its palm trees, pastel walls and neon signs.”

What is your favourite part of the design?

“My favourite part of the design besides the colours and fresh feel is the fact that California Lane is so narrow. Bakery Lane has a courtyard, Winn Lane is hippy and eclectic, and California Lane is a narrow laneway that connects all the way through to Ann Street, having the potential to be a thoroughfare like a traditional laneway.”

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The result

Designed to achieve the delicate balance of business and pleasure and provide a haven for pedestrian traffic, the highly anticipated laneway showcases emerging brands and trendy boutiques among exquisite cafes, bars and eateries, to create an ideal spot for dining in style.

As we’re sure you can appreciate, reading about California Lane is one thing, but experiencing it for yourself is quite another. If you live in Brisbane or are due to visit, we encourage you to take a stroll back in time and enjoy the vintage West Coast vibes and fantastic food that California Lane is soon to be known for.

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Ravenhall Correctional Centre wins Master Builders Award

Ravenhall Correctional Centre designed by Guymer Bailey Architects and built by John Holland Group won the Master Builders Victoria Excellence in Construction of Commercial Buildings over $80M award at the 2018 Excellence in Construction Awards.

Ravenhall Correctional Centre, which is aiming to become the benchmark for rehabilitative prisons worldwide, is the largest prison in Victoria, currently one of the largest correctional facilities in Australia and the first Public Private Partnership (PPP) prison to be delivered on time.

The Correctional Centre consists of 42 buildings within a secure perimeter wall and a further five buildings external of the wall to cater for other services and government facilities. Buildings include medium-security and transitional accommodation, residential accommodation, medical facilities, reception and visiting areas and industry buildings for trade training.

Director of Guymer Bailey and lead Architect on the project, Kavan Applegate, said, “The Ravenhall Correctional Centre has been four years in the making and a combined effort across our architecture, landscape and interiors teams. Our builders, John Holland Group, have brilliantly executed our drawings to built form, and we extend our congratulations on winning the Master Builders Award.”

Over 63,000 plants were used in the landscaping of the Correctional Centre with multiple sports courts, shelters and external fitness equipment also designed by our landscaping team.

Rob Waddell, Principal Landscape Architect on the project, said, “Access to and interaction with the natural environment positively impacts on human physical, social and cultural needs. The landscape design for Ravenhall seeks to physically and psychologically reconnect prisoners with quality outdoor spaces, which will directly impact on prisoner health and wellbeing, both mental and physical.”

South Coast Correctional Centre Expansion Open and Ready for Inmates

The new 200-bed minimum-security wing at the South Coast Correctional Centre (SCCC), designed by Guymer Bailey Architects, has been opened by the New South Wales (NSW) Department of Justice and inmates have started to be transferred.

The minimum-security wing expansion which has been designed to feel more like a campus than a correctional centre, includes accommodation for inmates, health facilities, staff amenities, a programs building and an industry building.

The new facility is part of the NSW Government’s $3.8 billion infrastructure program to help reduce recidivism rates among offenders through upgraded educational and work programs. With more than 80% of inmates at SCCC enrolled in a trade or other upskilling program, these new facilities will significantly assist with the rehabilitation of offenders.

Allan Pearson, the Senior Architect on the project, said, “The South Coast Correctional Centre expansion has been two and a half years in the making, so it is a great achievement to see the new minimum-security wing open.” 

The stand-alone facility is part of a broader expansion that also includes a 160-bed maximum-security wing that is expected to open at the site next year.

STUDENT WORK | NEW GRADUATE JUSTINE LENKIEWICZ

At the end of last year we showcased some of our students work - one of which was Justine Lenkiewicz from our Melbourne office. Fast forward 6 months, and Justine has recently completed her Master of Architecture. 

Agenda
Jack’s Magazine is an utterly unnatural, man-made terrain caught between the threshold of passive suburbia and organic natural landscape. This thesis will explore the site as a gradient between the urban and natural dichotomy, focusing on water as the element that brings the nature back into to the human through physical connection to space and spiritual connection to self. It will explore the site as a series of experiential moments that will form the filtering process from one end of the spectrum to the other. At which point has the threshold been crossed? Is it perhaps more about the liminal space between these polarities, the journey, rather than the destination?


to bathe is to fall into step with your biological rhythms, in and out breathing, the speed of blood coursing through your veins, the slowness of tiredness…the mechanical world of objective time, seconds, minutes, hours – is irrelevant here. Taking a bath properly requires being able to guiltlessly linger, hang out, and do nothing whatsoever.

Design Statement
Saltwater Springs will be an urban oasis, a centre for physical and mental wellbeing, at the former Jack’s Magazine site. As a junction between dense urbanism and natural landscape, the site will bridge the broken ecological and social connections that humans have with nature and within themselves. Water is a source of life and it will be the element that heals the site. In its untainted form, it imitates physical and spiritual purity and cleansing. The healing process will begin by physically restoring the eroded banks of the Maribyrnong River and reconnecting the former canal. This will clear the conscience and allow for the mental healing process to begin. Meandering boardwalks throughout the new landscape will lead you to the centre of the site - an adaptive reuse of the former gun powder magazine buildings where a program of various meditation, hydrotherapy and balneotherapy techniques, will allow one to rejuvenate the self.


Floor plans, sections and renders

Hero render: Justine Lenkiewicz (Graduating work)

CALDARIUM: Justine Lenkiewicz

VISTA: Justine Lenkiewicz

VISTA: Justine Lenkiewicz

MASTERPLAN: Justine Lenkiewicz

ENTRY: Justine Lenkiewicz

WETLANDS: Justine Lenkiewicz

Unlike the luxury and privacy of modern day spa houses, the traditional public bath house was once an intense community centre for social gatherings in our cities – a vital public space for social, cultural and political exchange. The first public baths in Ancient Greece and Rome arose from a communal need for cleanliness, at a time when most people did not have access to private bathing facilities, and were traditionally segregated based on gender. They consisted of three basic interconnected rooms – the caldarium, the tepidarium and the frigidarium. The Roman frigidarium was a cold water pool that patrons would immerse themselves in as preparation, before moving into the warmer rooms. The Ottomans introduced the Islamic ablution ritual into the bathing experience. The body had to be purified and rid of sin before entering the bath rooms, and they believed this could only be achieved through running water. The body was prepared by a cleansing ritual involving a laconicum – a hot dry steam room, to open the pores, a shower, and a sea salt scrub down. The sequencing of rooms was hence also reversed, so that you would enter through hottest rooms and move progressively through to the coldest, before finishing off with refreshing cold running water in the sudatorium, a hot wet steam room.

Despite varying typology, culture and tradition, the bath house has always been an institution for health, socialization and pleasure – a central aspect to community life.

We are living in increasingly urbanized environments, that distance us from nature and from ourselves. Lack of quality open space has a flow on effect onto inactivity and lack of connectedness, which in turn leads to reduced quality of life. The bath house offers a powerful sensorial sanctuary from the stressors and rabid consumerism of our modern age life. It is a place for stillness and reflection, wellness and mindfulness. It blurs the boundaries of traditional male and female ablution, of public and private, and of communal and personal. It is a place of anti-conflict, anti-competition and anti-hierarchy. The armor of our daily lives are discarded with our clothes, and the perils of our overworked, overstressed lives melt away with the steam.

Located at the threshold of man-made terrain of passive suburbia and organic natural landscape, the site represents a state of tension. It captivates visitors with its cavernous barrel vault interiors and the height of its massive earth mounds. But beyond the fortifying perimeter wall, the site has a fragmented relationship with its surroundings. Rapid urbanization in the area is reducing the quality the biodiversity and greenery in the space. We see this represented in the ecological destruction of the banks of the Maribyrnong and the intensity of flooding that occurs in the area. As we become distanced from nature, we see correlations between deteriorating mental and physical health. In a systems worldview, one can only truly thrive if the other does as well.

Water is the element that resolves this tension and brings nature back into the human through physical connection to space and spiritual connection to self.

Jack’s Magazine is protected by heritage status and is seen as a significant historical and cultural landmark for Victoria’s industrial and military past. But apart from the impressive scale of the man-made blast mounds, local Victorian bluestone construction and grand barrel vault interiors - the site is a barricaded and confined, degenerative and withdrawn place that stands for social and ecological destruction. Is this something that Victorian’s should value and uphold? By definition, adaptive reuse uses an old space or building and revitalizes it with new life and purpose that is socially and environmentally appropriate to its context.

Saltwater Springs will bring relief to the physical barriers of the site, regenerate ecologically and spiritually for flora, fauna and human to flourish, contribute to the community by addressing issues that have been identified by locals, and invigorate Jack’s Magazine.

RAVENHALL PRISON NAMED AUSTRALIA’S BEST INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECT

Victoria’s $670 million Ravenhall Prison Project has been named as Australia’s best infrastructure project at Infrastructure Partnerships Australia’s National Infrastructure Awards.

Ravenhall Prison - Original concept design

“It is exciting to see the Ravenhall Prison Project win the Project of the Year Award as it is the first privately delivered prison project Victoria has seen in about 20 years – delivered on-budget and on-time”
— IPA Chief Executive Adrian Dwyer.

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“The Ravenhall Prison Project fundamentally transforms the way that support is provided to people in the justice system in Victoria.

“In a Victorian first, the proponents will oversee all elements of the prison’s operations, including custodial services, with performance targets to directly reduce the rate of recidivism.

“Australia is a world leader in bringing together the public and private sectors through Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) to deliver better outcomes for the community.

“The Ravenhall Prison Project is a stellar example of the evolution of the PPP model in Australia and shows what can be achieved when the public and private sectors collaborate to achieve good outcomes.

“I pass on my congratulations to the winners of the Project of the Year Award tonight,” Mr Dwyer said.

Transitions Hub Courtyard

Community 4 

Cell Building Day Room

Internal recreation space


The National Infrastructure Awards are convened by Infrastructure Partnerships Australia each year, recognising excellence in public administration and business, across major projects. The Project of the Year is the most prestigious of the Awards.

MARY CAIRNCROSS | REALISING OUR VISION

MARY CAIRNCROSS | REALISING OUR VISION

We are looking back on our original concept for the redevelopment of the Mary Cairncross Scenic Reserve Discovery Centre. 

SHEPPARTON COURTS | WORK IN PROGRESS

Work in progress photos from Shepparton Law Courts – Practical completion is expected next week for Stage 1 works.

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For monthly progress updates follow @CourtSVic on Twitter and #SheppCourts
— Court Services Victoria

Project Team

Builder: ADCO Construction

Principle Consultant: Architectus Group Pty Ltd, GHD Woodhead and Guymer Bailey Architects

Project Manager: Ontoit

Quantity Surveyor: Wilde and Woolard

STUDENT WORK | Rachel Hur

Part Two of our student work showcase is the work of recent graduate Rachel Hur. Rachel has just completed her Masters of Architecture at Melbourne University. 

'The Wall'

This semester was 4 months of research and design to come up with a final design proposal for my independent thesis project. The project was for a transitional facility in Ararat. The brief was for 20 residential living units, with a few programs spaces (library, recreational space and communal kitchen) and staff areas (interview rooms, pharmacy and office areas).

3D render: Rachel Hur

No facility within Australia exists for those transitioning from prison to society. This thesis demonstrates that a design with the form and function of walls can allow for this transition. The design utilizes a singular, curved wall that creates spatial moments which in its concave and convex forms articulate different levels of transition. The design overlays a gradient over the selected site as an abstraction of the journey of transition. The element of the wall plays on the perimeter wall, a typical boundary of a prison. In everyday residencies, there are many forms of permeable and solid property boundaries, thus the wall is present in both instances of penitentiary and residential typologies.

Plan: Rachel Hur

This design proposes a gradient within the program as well, allowing residents of the facility different degrees of control and choice through the varying spaces. This project unites both elements of wall and gradient to explore the spatial journey from imprisonment to freedom.

3D render: Rachel Hur

The form and function of singular, curved wall creates a transitional journey from incarceration to freedom.
— Rachel Hur

3D render: Rachel Hur

STUDENT WORK | Justine Lenkiewicz

This week we will be showcasing some of the amazing work that our students have produced throughout the year. First up is Justine Lenkiewicz's studio work, as well as her Tower Project. 

BOOMHouse Studio

BOOMFlat Sectional Perspective linework FINAL

PROJECT BRIEF: BOOMHouse Studio explored a share-house typology as a solution to the aged care crisis currently facing Australia. Throughout the semester, a range of housing scales were explored. The final project was a single house occupying one lot that would address the needs of four Baby Boomer couples who have decided to live together in a single share-house scenario. The focus throughout the semester was largely on combining facilities, child care and medical support, and providing appropriate dignified, private accommodation as needed; in order to encourage the integration of young seniors back into the larger community, and ensure their contribution and relevance to society is maintained. The final aim was to provide options that were spatially efficient, functionally desirable, affordable and attractive, in the context of the world’s most liveable city, Melbourne.

CONCEPT: My aim was to take a universal approach so that people of all backgrounds, shapes and sizes could have equal access to all the spaces. I employed a single-storey concept with a variety of communal spaces, and shared facilities. Creating layers of privacy was important to cater to individual personality types and needs, as well as to buffer the highly active zones from the more passive zones of the house. Bedrooms were designed to all be equal in size, orientation and access to daylight. A series of vertical strip windows and brick penetrations in the north facade allow dappled light to filter into the rooms throughout the day while keeping heat gain minimal. The presence of the existing tree resulted in a courtyard space that allowed the building to huddle around the tree. This formed an introverted shape with little nooks for reading, private study, and a small kitchenette. The lightwell corridor is something I carried on throughout my projects in this studio. It stems from the concept of changing light and shadow symbolising transitional spaces. The corridor becomes the moment the residents transition between the passive house and the active house.

The corridor in the BOOMFlat project behaves as the buffer zone between the bedroom and the open plan living spaces. In addition to creating a physical separation between the areas, it also houses the laundry facilities and the study zone adding further layers of privacy. Passing through an external threshold leads to the “active” house. Orienting the building to the north and pushing it to southern boundary enabled the creation of a large northern outdoor courtyard and for the spaces to sprawl out and become a lot more extroverted in contrast to the passive side. An open plan arrangement, coupled with the use of generous glazing and sliding doors allows enables fluid movement between the spaces and encourages social activity as boundaries are blurred.

Using a raked ceiling allows the spaces to visually extend out to appear bigger and allow pleasant wintery sun to come through while blocking out harsh summer sun. White brick veneer has been used for its solid, timeless quality; thermal mass benefits and it’s unique production history in Melbourne’s northern suburbs. The skylight level uses a lightweight blueboard cladding material with a white rendered texture finish to blend in with the rest of the building. Extended parapet walls allow the “brick wall” to become a main feature of the house. A darker ‘monument’ colour for the roofing creates a simple contrast in colours.

Timber batten screening is used to delineate spaces such as the carport - which creates a visual barrier from the front of the street and also provides shading from the western sun – as well as the dry court from the outdoor dining area.

Turbine Tower

PROJECT BRIEF: The European Cultural Capital program is an initiative to promote the diversity of European Cultures within member states, instill a sense of belonging in Europeans, and foster contribution of culture to the development of cities. A strong focus on local and community involvement saw Leeuwarden surpass much bigger cities, such as Amsterdam and Eindhoven, in their bid for the European Cultural Capital 2018. These core values combine to create the overarching ‘Iepen Mienskip’ (open community) theme for the 2018 program. The city will host the program for one year. The program is viewed as an opportunity, not only for the city, but also the province of Friesland, to generate cultural, social and economic benefit that will help foster urban regeneration and boost awareness and tourism by raising it’s profile on an international scale.

Our brief was to create a series of design interventions for sites in and around the city, in anticipation of the program and the level of traffic it will bring. The site for my project was the Blokhusipoort, a thriving hub of small creative businesses that will soon house the city’s library and a youth hostel. Since it was transformed from a prison in 2007, the inhabitants of the unique precinct have created a strong identity within the community. Today, the complex houses 130 small creative companies, a theatre, the popular Cafe de Bak, Frisian Design Factory, and the Headquarters for Leeuwarden 2018.

The Turbine Tower site intervention looks towards 2040 with a longer-term solution for the site, when Leeuwarden has reaped the cultural and economic benefits of hosting the Cultural Capital and has become a gained international recognition and the Blokhuispoort has become a landmark tourist destination for people visiting Friesland.

CONCEPT: The Turbine Tower aims to become an iconic radio communications tower, in the heart of Leeuwarden City, following it’s successful run of the European Cultural Capital Program. It is as once a point of connection and wayfinding, exhibition of materiality and history, and cultural symbolism of the core ‘iepen mienskip’ (open community) values that create the overarching theme of the year long festival, taking place in Leeuwarden, Friesland in 2018.

ART SHOW RECAP

Guymer Bailey Brisbane came alive on Friday night when we once again opened our doors to clients, consultants, friends, family and the community for a night of Art. Paintings, sculptures and photography were proudly displayed by the staff who created them, along with the series of Kandinsky artworks that had been made the week prior in afternoon Art Class.

Over $1000 was raised on the night through the sale of entry and raffle tickets, donations made directly to our fundraising page and through the sale of donated artworks. All funds raised are donated directly to Hear and Say – a not-for-profit organisation that supports children with hearing loss to listen and speak so that they can attend regular school, have wider career choices and can more fully participate in their community.

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ART SHOW SPONSORS // our amazing sponsors who made Friday night possible.

Prize donations from -
Medusa Hair Studio
Kingspan
Allegion
BONDOR
LIGHT AND DESIGN GROUP
Sassi at Toowong
MJS Floorcoverings
Enware Australia Pty Ltd
ALAN INNES

And to those who donated directly to our Everyday Hero page for Hear and Say -
Greg Killen – Greg Killen Consulting Engineers
Cameron Gorrie – Building Certifiers Australia
Greg Hamilton – Hdesign
Nerada Spellacy – Guymer Bailey Architects
Suzanne Goodson – Guymer Bailey Architects
Chris Collins – Taking Shape, Toowong

UNDER CONSTRUCTION: FERNY HILLS AQUATIC CENTRE

UNDER CONSTRUCTION: FERNY HILLS AQUATIC CENTRE

Guymer Bailey Architects has designed the new Ferny Hills Aquatic Centre Program Pool, which replaces the old 25-metre pool. The design integrates with the existing facilities by using simple low maintenance and durable finishes that can be brought through to the planned splash pad area. 

ROB WADDELL TO PRESENT AT QLD AWARDS SHOWCASE

Guymer Bailey's Principal Landscape Architect, Rob Waddell will be presenting at the AILA QLD awards showcase this Thursday!

Hear from Rob Waddell, Guymer Bailey Landscape on the details of the project: Mary Cairncross Scenic Reserve at the upcoming Awards Showcase on Thursday 3 August in Brisbane. Register online at www.aila.org.au/qldevents 

The jury comments: the project represents a a highly successful collaboration between landscape architect and architect, where the outcome is a seamlessly integrated nature tourism facility. The Landscape Architect’s engagement with traditional owners shows respect to cultural and environmental values of the site. The landscape design greatly enhances the visitor experience to the site, unifying the building with the surrounding rainforest and is a worthy recipient of a Landscape Award.

The Awards Showcase will be held over breakfast and feature 3 award winners speaking on their projects.