guymer bailey architects

STUDENT WORK | NEW GRADUATE JUSTINE LENKIEWICZ

At the end of last year we showcased some of our students work - one of which was Justine Lenkiewicz from our Melbourne office. Fast forward 6 months, and Justine has recently completed her Master of Architecture. 

Agenda
Jack’s Magazine is an utterly unnatural, man-made terrain caught between the threshold of passive suburbia and organic natural landscape. This thesis will explore the site as a gradient between the urban and natural dichotomy, focusing on water as the element that brings the nature back into to the human through physical connection to space and spiritual connection to self. It will explore the site as a series of experiential moments that will form the filtering process from one end of the spectrum to the other. At which point has the threshold been crossed? Is it perhaps more about the liminal space between these polarities, the journey, rather than the destination?


to bathe is to fall into step with your biological rhythms, in and out breathing, the speed of blood coursing through your veins, the slowness of tiredness…the mechanical world of objective time, seconds, minutes, hours – is irrelevant here. Taking a bath properly requires being able to guiltlessly linger, hang out, and do nothing whatsoever.

Design Statement
Saltwater Springs will be an urban oasis, a centre for physical and mental wellbeing, at the former Jack’s Magazine site. As a junction between dense urbanism and natural landscape, the site will bridge the broken ecological and social connections that humans have with nature and within themselves. Water is a source of life and it will be the element that heals the site. In its untainted form, it imitates physical and spiritual purity and cleansing. The healing process will begin by physically restoring the eroded banks of the Maribyrnong River and reconnecting the former canal. This will clear the conscience and allow for the mental healing process to begin. Meandering boardwalks throughout the new landscape will lead you to the centre of the site - an adaptive reuse of the former gun powder magazine buildings where a program of various meditation, hydrotherapy and balneotherapy techniques, will allow one to rejuvenate the self.


Floor plans, sections and renders

Hero render: Justine Lenkiewicz (Graduating work)

CALDARIUM: Justine Lenkiewicz

VISTA: Justine Lenkiewicz

VISTA: Justine Lenkiewicz

MASTERPLAN: Justine Lenkiewicz

ENTRY: Justine Lenkiewicz

WETLANDS: Justine Lenkiewicz

Unlike the luxury and privacy of modern day spa houses, the traditional public bath house was once an intense community centre for social gatherings in our cities – a vital public space for social, cultural and political exchange. The first public baths in Ancient Greece and Rome arose from a communal need for cleanliness, at a time when most people did not have access to private bathing facilities, and were traditionally segregated based on gender. They consisted of three basic interconnected rooms – the caldarium, the tepidarium and the frigidarium. The Roman frigidarium was a cold water pool that patrons would immerse themselves in as preparation, before moving into the warmer rooms. The Ottomans introduced the Islamic ablution ritual into the bathing experience. The body had to be purified and rid of sin before entering the bath rooms, and they believed this could only be achieved through running water. The body was prepared by a cleansing ritual involving a laconicum – a hot dry steam room, to open the pores, a shower, and a sea salt scrub down. The sequencing of rooms was hence also reversed, so that you would enter through hottest rooms and move progressively through to the coldest, before finishing off with refreshing cold running water in the sudatorium, a hot wet steam room.

Despite varying typology, culture and tradition, the bath house has always been an institution for health, socialization and pleasure – a central aspect to community life.

We are living in increasingly urbanized environments, that distance us from nature and from ourselves. Lack of quality open space has a flow on effect onto inactivity and lack of connectedness, which in turn leads to reduced quality of life. The bath house offers a powerful sensorial sanctuary from the stressors and rabid consumerism of our modern age life. It is a place for stillness and reflection, wellness and mindfulness. It blurs the boundaries of traditional male and female ablution, of public and private, and of communal and personal. It is a place of anti-conflict, anti-competition and anti-hierarchy. The armor of our daily lives are discarded with our clothes, and the perils of our overworked, overstressed lives melt away with the steam.

Located at the threshold of man-made terrain of passive suburbia and organic natural landscape, the site represents a state of tension. It captivates visitors with its cavernous barrel vault interiors and the height of its massive earth mounds. But beyond the fortifying perimeter wall, the site has a fragmented relationship with its surroundings. Rapid urbanization in the area is reducing the quality the biodiversity and greenery in the space. We see this represented in the ecological destruction of the banks of the Maribyrnong and the intensity of flooding that occurs in the area. As we become distanced from nature, we see correlations between deteriorating mental and physical health. In a systems worldview, one can only truly thrive if the other does as well.

Water is the element that resolves this tension and brings nature back into the human through physical connection to space and spiritual connection to self.

Jack’s Magazine is protected by heritage status and is seen as a significant historical and cultural landmark for Victoria’s industrial and military past. But apart from the impressive scale of the man-made blast mounds, local Victorian bluestone construction and grand barrel vault interiors - the site is a barricaded and confined, degenerative and withdrawn place that stands for social and ecological destruction. Is this something that Victorian’s should value and uphold? By definition, adaptive reuse uses an old space or building and revitalizes it with new life and purpose that is socially and environmentally appropriate to its context.

Saltwater Springs will bring relief to the physical barriers of the site, regenerate ecologically and spiritually for flora, fauna and human to flourish, contribute to the community by addressing issues that have been identified by locals, and invigorate Jack’s Magazine.

GUYMER BAILEY TAKE ON THE RIVER TO ROOFTOP CHALLENGE

Congratulations to the girls from Guymer Bailey Brisbane who took on the River to Rooftop challenge on Friday. 

Team Guymer Bailey after conquering the 1040 step climb

ABOUT RIVER TO ROOFTOP
River to Rooftop is a great opportunity to have fun and get fit whilst raising awareness and to help make a difference for women and kids experiencing domestic violence. Women's Legal Service helps mothers and their kids to secure safer futures. They provide free services providing practical legal tools to help women living with domestic violence and each year aid more than 11,000 women and with them, over 17,000 children.  

In one week the team raised just under $800 - and there is still time to donate. Simply click on the button below to be taken to the Guymer Bailey fundraising page. 

CYCLE OF GIVING 2018

Raising fund for medical research, yesterday cyclists from Guymer Bailey Architects took part in the annual Cycle of Giving charity ride.

Passionate about supporting the community that supports us, and fostering a culture of sustainability and philanthropy through our organisation, Guymer Bailey supports many charities and community events throughout the year.

Team Guymer Bailey cycling towards the finish line

Team Guymer Bailey cycling towards the finish line

Pictured above, cyclists from Guymer Bailey Architects took part in the annual Cycle of Giving ride (100km), to raise funds for organ transplant research and awareness for organ donation.

At any one time, there are about 1500 Australians waiting for an organ or tissue donation to save their lives. Without medical research finding better ways to source, match and transplant organs, this list is only going to get bigger. The money that is raised for the 2018 Cycle of Giving goes towards key research organ transplant projects at The Prince Charles Hospital.

This was the fifth year that Guymer Bailey took part in the cycle - a cause very close to our hearts as we have seen first hand how Organ Donation can transform a persons life. 

Although the cycle is over, we will still be fundraising for the next couple of weeks, with every dollar making a difference. 


To find out more about the medical research at The Prince Charles Hospital - https://www.cycleofgiving.org.au/champion/2018/page?articleid=170

To find out more about Organ and Tissue Donation in Australia - https://register.donatelife.gov.au/

To learn more about the charities Guymer Bailey supports - https://www.guymerbailey.com.au/corporate-responsibility

STUDENT WORK | Rachel Hur

Part Two of our student work showcase is the work of recent graduate Rachel Hur. Rachel has just completed her Masters of Architecture at Melbourne University. 

'The Wall'

This semester was 4 months of research and design to come up with a final design proposal for my independent thesis project. The project was for a transitional facility in Ararat. The brief was for 20 residential living units, with a few programs spaces (library, recreational space and communal kitchen) and staff areas (interview rooms, pharmacy and office areas).

3D render: Rachel Hur

No facility within Australia exists for those transitioning from prison to society. This thesis demonstrates that a design with the form and function of walls can allow for this transition. The design utilizes a singular, curved wall that creates spatial moments which in its concave and convex forms articulate different levels of transition. The design overlays a gradient over the selected site as an abstraction of the journey of transition. The element of the wall plays on the perimeter wall, a typical boundary of a prison. In everyday residencies, there are many forms of permeable and solid property boundaries, thus the wall is present in both instances of penitentiary and residential typologies.

Plan: Rachel Hur

This design proposes a gradient within the program as well, allowing residents of the facility different degrees of control and choice through the varying spaces. This project unites both elements of wall and gradient to explore the spatial journey from imprisonment to freedom.

3D render: Rachel Hur

The form and function of singular, curved wall creates a transitional journey from incarceration to freedom.
— Rachel Hur

3D render: Rachel Hur

ART SHOW RECAP

Guymer Bailey Brisbane came alive on Friday night when we once again opened our doors to clients, consultants, friends, family and the community for a night of Art. Paintings, sculptures and photography were proudly displayed by the staff who created them, along with the series of Kandinsky artworks that had been made the week prior in afternoon Art Class.

Over $1000 was raised on the night through the sale of entry and raffle tickets, donations made directly to our fundraising page and through the sale of donated artworks. All funds raised are donated directly to Hear and Say – a not-for-profit organisation that supports children with hearing loss to listen and speak so that they can attend regular school, have wider career choices and can more fully participate in their community.

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ART SHOW SPONSORS // our amazing sponsors who made Friday night possible.

Prize donations from -
Medusa Hair Studio
Kingspan
Allegion
BONDOR
LIGHT AND DESIGN GROUP
Sassi at Toowong
MJS Floorcoverings
Enware Australia Pty Ltd
ALAN INNES

And to those who donated directly to our Everyday Hero page for Hear and Say -
Greg Killen – Greg Killen Consulting Engineers
Cameron Gorrie – Building Certifiers Australia
Greg Hamilton – Hdesign
Nerada Spellacy – Guymer Bailey Architects
Suzanne Goodson – Guymer Bailey Architects
Chris Collins – Taking Shape, Toowong