Guymer Bailey Landscape

We're hiring a Graduate Landscape Architect

Our Brisbane Studio is currently looking for a Graduate Landscape Architect to join our team.

Guymer Bailey Landscape is a landscape design specialisation within Guymer Bailey Architects. Since its inception in 1989, Guymer Bailey has been committed to integrating landscape design with architecture through all of our projects.

We are an enthusiastic team of landscape architects who work on a variety of projects for both public and private sector clients. Recent projects have included residential gardens, community facilities, sport and recreational facilities, streetscapes, public transport as well as large scale infrastructure.

We are seeking a Graduate Landscape Architect for a full time position in our Brisbane office with the following attributes:

  • A bachelor’s degree in Landscape Architecture (from an accredited university course)

  • One to three years post-graduate experience in a landscape design practice

  • Strong communication skills - both written and verbal

  • Able to work independently and as a team member

  • Strong graphic design skills

  • Proficient computer skills in CAD (particular ArchiCAD), Adobe Suite and Microsoft Office

  • Willingness to develop their professional capabilities

As a part of Guymer Bailey Landscape you will be required to provide input into a range of services including master planning, design and documentation, and contract administration of landscape architecture and urban design projects.

We encourage and support all of our staff to develop their professional skills and to remain intellectually and technically up to date by undertaking professional development and training programs.

If you share our goals, have the required skills, are self-motivated and would enjoy working as part of our team then we would like to hear from you!

Competitive remuneration will be offered commensurate with skills and experience.

If you are interested in joining our Brisbane landscape team please contact:

Contact: Rob Waddell

Email: landscape@guymerbailey.com.au

Changes in playground design

By Rob Waddell

Significant changes have been happening in playground design over the last few years due to greater recognition around the health and cognitive benefits of play, a strong desire to get children active and outside, and modifications to playground safety standards that acknowledge the benefit of graduated challenges which teach children how to manage risk.

Out of all of the changes, we have found three key trends are emerging, and these are influencing the design of playgrounds both nationally and internationally.

1. Unlocking imagination through theming

Photography by Scott Burrows

Photography by Scott Burrows

With the introduction of video games and tablets, there is no question that the way a child plays and interacts with the world has changed.

Twenty years ago outdoor play was a way of life for us; we would disappear for hours on end building forts, riding bikes and playing sports. But now, with so much entertainment and stimulation available indoors, greater incentive to switch from screen time to green time is needed.

This has seen a rise in playground themes to evoke the imaginations of children, allowing spaces to be interpreted and used in a number of different ways to create a unique play experience for each child.

One example of this is the Frew Park Arena Play Structure Guymer Bailey Landscape designed. Built on the grounds where the iconic Milton tennis stadium once stood in Brisbane, its theme ‘deconstruction’ honours the history of the site with play precincts that reflect stadium spaces.

The grandstand is brought to life with large precast concrete panels of varying heights and angles, and it even features a commentary box – a steel-mesh box suspended eight metres above the ground, to offer greater thrill to playground goers.

2. Getting back to nature

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With many children experiencing nature deficit disorder not being able to play in the creek, squish mud in between their fingers and toes, climb trees and get dirty in play, there is a growing demand to create this experience within the playground environment.

This is particularly important for kindy children who benefit from the sensory experience nature play can produce.

From mud pits and water play to sitting on logs around a fire pit, roasting marshmallows for story time, nature play experiences allow children to enjoy the beauty and simplicity of nature, and hopefully inspire a deep love for the outdoors.

The key to nature play is to make it authentic using as many raw materials as possible. There are many plastic replicas available, but they do not create the same experience for children. Nature play areas should also be flexible, allowing for a wide variety of activities, sensory experiences and individual play interpretations – such as logs that can be used for sitting, standing or balancing on.

3. Creating a call to adventure

Photography by Scott Burrows

Photography by Scott Burrows

While as children we were quite adventurous in our play, as a society in recent years we have been more cautious, preventing children from taking the same risks as we did. While these intentions are noble, in that we don’t want children hurt, what we have failed to realise is that we are preventing children from learning key life lessons through play.

Research has proven time and time again that there are significant benefits when children are exposed to risk.

Adventurous or more challenging play allows children to identify their strengths and limitations, manage risk and fear and develop courage and confidence in their abilities – all fundamental life skills that are needed into adulthood.

These findings have resulted in modifications to the Australian playground safety standards that allow playground designs to greater challenge children and expose them to managed risk, where previous standards were inhibiting their form of play.

Challenges at height including climbing walls, nets, ropes, tunnels, barriers, slopes, sliding poles, swings and flying foxes can all create greater playground challenges for children that allow them to get a better sense of risk and themselves. By being more adventurous in playground design while also keeping in mind age and ability, we can provide children with greater life skills.

Does your kindy, school or community playground need an upgrade to create more imaginative and challenging play? Talk to our specialist playground designers today on 07 3870 9700 (Brisbane) or 03 8547 5000 (Melbourne).

About the Author

Rob Waddell is the Principal Landscape Architect at Guymer Bailey Architects. With extensive experience in designing landscape architecture for the community and education sectors, Rob has a proven track record of designing award-winning outdoor areas that capture the hearts and imaginations of children and enrich the experiences of the local community. With a keen interest in exploring the relationship between natural and built environments, Rob develops high-quality design outcomes that prioritise placemaking and people-centred design that works in harmony with the natural environment.

Why sustainability is needed in schools

Photography by Scott Burrows

Photography by Scott Burrows

By Phil Jackson

With greater demands to decrease costs, and a desire to minimise environmental impact, improve efficiency and increase student learning and performance, schools are starting to recognise the need to become more sustainable.

But with many principals, boards and P&F committees balancing multiple needs, there is often a focus on short-term costs and savings, which can create more resistance around the long-term move towards greater sustainability.

To help you shift your perspective, I’ll explore three reasons why sustainability is needed in schools and how it can give your school and students a greater competitive edge.

1. Improve performance with greater comfort and air quality

Photography by Scott Burrows

Photography by Scott Burrows

While many schools install air-conditioning for the comfort of students and teachers, what most staff members and P&F committees are unaware of is that the quality of air can be dramatically affected. In air-conditioned environments more Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is present in the air, affecting the cognitive ability and learning capability of students in the classroom.

It’s a conundrum, isn’t it? We put students into classrooms and exam rooms that are air-conditioned for their comfort only to create the worst possible air quality for them to perform and compete against other schools in.

The good news is that through sustainable initiatives both the comfort and air quality of classrooms can be improved. While there are times when air-conditioning must be used, there are times when air-conditioning could be minimised through the use of a more effective passive ventilation design (like using louvres) that will allow greater fresh air and breezes through the classroom.

Do measures like this make an impact, you might ask? A study done by the United States Environmental Protection Agency that examined the costs and benefits of green schools for Washington State estimated a 15% reduction in absenteeism and a 5% increase in test scores.

2. Minimise costs and reduce inefficiency

Photography by Scott Burrows

Photography by Scott Burrows

With air-conditioning seen as a necessity, little thought or planning can go into the ongoing cost and maintenance of systems. Energy bills can skyrocket, particularly when there is little education or incentive around minimising air-conditioning use in classrooms.

By linking both passive ventilation methods and air-conditioning to both a smart (automatically switches between passive ventilation, assisted ventilation, or air-conditioning based on settings) and manually controlled system, staff and students can become more conscious of their decision to use air-conditioning within the classroom. The installation of a CO2 monitor (Australian Geographic has a weather system that measures CO2 levels) can also be a valuable teaching tool to show the air quality of each classroom when the air-conditioning is on.

Schools can further encourage more sustainable thinking through the use of incentives, offering a reward to the class who uses air-conditioning the least throughout the term.

A holistic site approach that considers the use of shading, solar power, and LED lighting can also further reduce costs.

3. Boost student engagement with different teaching environments

Photography by Scott Burrows

Photography by Scott Burrows

Photography by Scott Burrows

Photography by Scott Burrows

While children thrive in routine, even their performance can be impacted by working in the same environment all of the time. By creating outdoor classroom environments, teachers and students can venture outside when the weather allows for different learning opportunities.

This not only boosts student engagement, but it also minimises costs of lighting and air-conditioning while providing greater connection to the landscape and better working conditions.

One example of the outdoor classroom idea is the Kimberley College Flexible Learning Area we designed.

Combining adaptable indoor learning spaces with flexible outdoor spaces that are large enough for full class groups, students are given many varied opportunities for interaction, performance, collaboration and connection to nature. The feedback from these outdoor classrooms and others like it have been overwhelmingly positive, with teachers and students both saying they are a pleasure to work in.

Schools that are making sustainability part of their governance are not only reaping the benefits of minimised costs and greater student engagement and performance; they are also addressing one of our greatest social challenges by empowering the next generation to be more environmentally minded.

About the Author

Phil Jackson is a Director of Guymer Bailey Architects and has a passion for sustainable design outcomes and the integration of architecture and landscape. From conception through to construction he ensures the delivery of outstanding projects and satisfied clients through open communication and enthusiasm for every project.

The importance of nature play in childcare

By Rob Waddell

There are many health benefits connected to nature play from cognitive, social and emotional development, to the building of resilience and creativity. But nature play is still not incorporated as much as it should be in childcare playground design.

If you’re yet to incorporate nature play in your childcare centre or kindy play area, here are five reasons why you should reconsider your approach.

1. Unscripted play increases imagination

Bellbowrie Kindy - 1.jpg

Children from a young age can experience a lot of structure to their lives, and while an element of structure and routine is needed for their happiness and wellbeing, too much structure, particularly around play, can stifle creativity.

Without being given prompts or recognisable play equipment, children are able to activate their imaginations, create stories, and be more likely to explore their environment.

At Guymer Bailey Landscape we believe in increasing the opportunities for children to enjoy more unstructured play outdoors and in nature, and were recently given the opportunity to bring this philosophy to life through the design of the new nature play space at Bellbowrie Kindy.

“In a world where children are constantly being told what to do, here was an opportunity to provide an unscripted play space that would foster imagination, creative thinking, and investigation.”
— Pam Niven, Kindergarten Teacher and Coordinator at Bellbowrie Kindy

Our team, in partnership with kindergarten teacher and coordinator, Pam Niven, and in consultation with parents and children at the Bellbowrie Kindy, created a space that consists of a number of features to encourage hours of unscripted play. These include:

Bellbowrie Kindy - 9.jpg
  • A natural watercourse fuelled by a water pump to allow kids to control the flow of water down the creek

  • Mudpits and digging mounds

  • Barefoot garden paths around a forest of natural totem poles

  • Log bridges, balance beams and stepping stones,

  • Scented and flowering native plants

  • Pottery garden

  • Yarning circle centred on a fire pit to introduce to children the indigenous concept of storytelling in an organic way

2. Getting dirty leads to happy exploration

Children need to be active and have the opportunity to run around and be happy playing outside. Worrying about stains and getting dirty only limits their play and can lead to guilt around activities that they find are fun and exciting.

Children who are given the time and opportunity to get dirty and explore, discover their world, and how things work. This exploration boosts their social, physical and creative skills, which can be well worth the extra washing.

3. Challenges teach resilience and risk management

“Children need the opportunity to develop their resilience through challenges”
— Pam Niven, Kindergarten Teacher and Coordinator at Bellbowrie Kindy
Bellbowrie Kindy - 6.jpg

The single-minded focus on injury prevention through risk elimination that the playground industry has had in recent decades, has been found to be detrimental to children by ignoring their need to learn how to manage risk themselves.

Changes to the Australian Standards last year reflected this shifting emphasis and recognised that the downsides of risks should be balanced against the very real benefits of incorporating meaningful graduated challenges for children to explore and test their capacities and limitations.

The Bellbowrie Kindy nature play space embraces this realisation, in the hope that even at the kindergarten age, we can set a course for stronger, better-equipped and more resilient future citizens.

4. Enlivening sensory experiences

Bellbowrie Kindy - 8.jpg

Nature play is a great way to engage all seven senses being sight, smell, touch, hearing, taste, vestibular (sense of balance) and proprioception (sense of body awareness in space). This is incredibly important when you consider sensory play has been proven to support fine and gross motor skills, cognitive growth, problem-solving skills and language and social development.

The design of the Bellbowrie Kindy nature play space has created an environment that enhances and enlivens the children’s sensory experience and importantly, at the same time, provides inclusion and engagement for those experiencing sensory impairment or disability.

5. Creating environmental awareness

Bellbowrie Kindy - 7.jpg
“We want to develop a love of nature that will help carry them through the rest of their lives”
— Pam Niven, Kindergarten Teacher and Coordinator at Bellbowrie Kindy

Perhaps one of the most underrated benefits of nature play is that it can also develop an environmental awareness and appreciation, which can create a concept of stewardship later in life. A legacy worth leaving our children.

Could your kindy or childcare centre benefit from more nature play? Talk to our specialist playground designers today on 07 3870 9700 (Brisbane) or 03 8547 5000 (Melbourne).

About the Author

Rob Waddell is the Principal Landscape Architect at Guymer Bailey Architects. With extensive experience in designing landscape architecture for the community and education sectors, Rob has a proven track record of designing award-winning outdoor areas that capture the hearts and imaginations of children and enrich the experiences of the local community. With a keen interest in exploring the relationship between natural and built environments, Rob develops high-quality design outcomes that prioritise placemaking and people-centred design and work in harmony with the natural environment.

Brisbane Art Show Recap

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The GBA Brisbane Studio came alive in a burst of colour for our annual Brisbane Pop Up Art Show fundraiser for Hear and Say that was held on LOUD Shirt Day, a national community initiative to raise funds so that children affected by hearing loss can live life loudly.

The annual community event showcased an incredible range of artwork created by the GBA Brisbane team and incredible local artists that included calligraphy, drawings, paintings, prints, photography, collage, glass, jewellery, sculptures and watercolours.

The art, along with live music, cheese and wine and a very special junk jam musical item from the team kept guests entertained as we raised $2,800 on the night for Hear and Say.

Phil Jackson, Director of Guymer Bailey Architects, said the Annual Art show is a proud tradition which has been running for six years.

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“Hear and Say is a wonderful not-for-profit organisation that assists children and young adults who experience hearing loss. The Annual Art show has been a proud tradition of ours to help raise much-needed funds for Hear and Say, so children and families can continue to get the highest standard of clinical care.”
— Phil Jackson, Director of Guymer Bailey Architects

Jim Green from Hear and Say who attended the event said,

“Hear and Say were delighted to be the beneficiaries of the 2018 Guymer Bailey Art Show. This unique Loud Shirt Day event is now into its sixth year and provides the perfect excuse to get dressed up in your best and brightest to support children who are deaf or hard of hearing. We would like to thank the team at Guymer Bailey and all the artists and attendees whose magnificent support has raised much-needed funds to give the gifts of sound and speech to children with hearing loss.”
— Jim Green, Hear and Say

Of course, a night like this doesn’t happen without some amazing and generous sponsors! We would like to thank the following businesses who donated our fantastic raffle prizes:

  • Corporate Information Systems (CIS) - Samsung Galaxy Tab A 8" with Toshiba 32GB MicroSD card

  • ARCPANEL - Weekend Getaway to Noosa

  • BRITEX - 2 x Premium Broncos tickets to any game and a $150 restaurant card

  • Webforge - Grandfather Solera Rare Tawny Port 20 years

  • Bondor - $100 Dymocks voucher

  • ALSPEC - $100 Indooroopilly voucher

  • CASF Surfaces - $100 BWS voucher

  • POLYFLOR - $100 Myer voucher

  • AWS - $50 Event Cinemas voucher and $50 Restaurant Choice voucher

  • KINGSPAN - $100 Gift voucher

  • ALLEGION - Schlage Sense Deadbolt

  • GWA - Clark Shower Screen Hook and a Pinot Noir

  • mLIGHT - Gourmet food hamper

  • Light and Design Group - Champagne and chocolates

Also, thanks to Zip Water for providing a shiny new Zip Hydro Tap! We can now enjoy sparkling water on tap and were able to provide our guests with a ‘plastic bottle free’ zone.

Even if you missed the Art Show, you can still donate! Click here to help children and young adults who are experiencing hearing loss continue to get the highest standard of clinical care.

For more images from our Brisbane Art Show head to our Facebook page.

Ravenhall Correctional Centre wins Master Builders Award

Ravenhall Correctional Centre designed by Guymer Bailey Architects and built by John Holland Group won the Master Builders Victoria Excellence in Construction of Commercial Buildings over $80M award at the 2018 Excellence in Construction Awards.

Ravenhall Correctional Centre, which is aiming to become the benchmark for rehabilitative prisons worldwide, is the largest prison in Victoria, currently one of the largest correctional facilities in Australia and the first Public Private Partnership (PPP) prison to be delivered on time.

The Correctional Centre consists of 42 buildings within a secure perimeter wall and a further five buildings external of the wall to cater for other services and government facilities. Buildings include medium-security and transitional accommodation, residential accommodation, medical facilities, reception and visiting areas and industry buildings for trade training.

Director of Guymer Bailey and lead Architect on the project, Kavan Applegate, said, “The Ravenhall Correctional Centre has been four years in the making and a combined effort across our architecture, landscape and interiors teams. Our builders, John Holland Group, have brilliantly executed our drawings to built form, and we extend our congratulations on winning the Master Builders Award.”

Over 63,000 plants were used in the landscaping of the Correctional Centre with multiple sports courts, shelters and external fitness equipment also designed by our landscaping team.

Rob Waddell, Principal Landscape Architect on the project, said, “Access to and interaction with the natural environment positively impacts on human physical, social and cultural needs. The landscape design for Ravenhall seeks to physically and psychologically reconnect prisoners with quality outdoor spaces, which will directly impact on prisoner health and wellbeing, both mental and physical.”

South Coast Correctional Centre Expansion Open and Ready for Inmates

The new 200-bed minimum-security wing at the South Coast Correctional Centre (SCCC), designed by Guymer Bailey Architects, has been opened by the New South Wales (NSW) Department of Justice and inmates have started to be transferred.

The minimum-security wing expansion which has been designed to feel more like a campus than a correctional centre, includes accommodation for inmates, health facilities, staff amenities, a programs building and an industry building.

The new facility is part of the NSW Government’s $3.8 billion infrastructure program to help reduce recidivism rates among offenders through upgraded educational and work programs. With more than 80% of inmates at SCCC enrolled in a trade or other upskilling program, these new facilities will significantly assist with the rehabilitation of offenders.

Allan Pearson, the Senior Architect on the project, said, “The South Coast Correctional Centre expansion has been two and a half years in the making, so it is a great achievement to see the new minimum-security wing open.” 

The stand-alone facility is part of a broader expansion that also includes a 160-bed maximum-security wing that is expected to open at the site next year.

WE ARE HIRING | GRADUATE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

Our Brisbane Studio are seeking a Graduate Landscape Architect to join our growing team. 

Guymer Bailey Landscape is a landscape design specialisation within Guymer Bailey Architects. Since its inception in 1989, Guymer Bailey has been committed to integrating landscape design with architecture through all of our projects.

We are an enthusiastic team of landscape architects and urban designers who work on a variety of projects for both public and private sector clients. Recent projects have included residential gardens, community facilities, sport and recreational facilities, streetscapes, public transport as well as large scale infrastructure.

We are seeking a Graduate Landscape Architect for a full time position in our Brisbane office with the following attributes:

  • A graduate degree in Landscape Architecture (from an accredited university course).
  • Three to Five years post-graduate experience in a landscape design practice.
  • Strong communication skills - both written and verbal.
  • Able to work independently and as a team member.
  • Proficient computer skills in CAD (particular ArchiCAD), Adobe Suite and Microsoft Office.
  • Willingness to develop their professional capabilities.

As a part of Guymer Bailey Landscape you will be required to provide input into a range of services including master planning, design and documentation, and contract administration of landscape architecture and urban design projects.

We encourage and support all of our staff to develop their professional skills and to remain intellectually and technically up to date by undertaking professional development and training programs.

If you share our goals, have the required skills, are self-motivated and would enjoy working as part of our team then we would like to hear from you!

Competitive remuneration will be offered commensurate with skills and experience.

If you are interested in joining our Brisbane landscape team please contact:

Contact: Rob Waddell
Email: landscape@guymerbailey.com.au

For more information click on the link below - 

GUYMER BAILEY TAKE ON THE RIVER TO ROOFTOP CHALLENGE

Congratulations to the girls from Guymer Bailey Brisbane who took on the River to Rooftop challenge on Friday. 

Team Guymer Bailey after conquering the 1040 step climb

ABOUT RIVER TO ROOFTOP
River to Rooftop is a great opportunity to have fun and get fit whilst raising awareness and to help make a difference for women and kids experiencing domestic violence. Women's Legal Service helps mothers and their kids to secure safer futures. They provide free services providing practical legal tools to help women living with domestic violence and each year aid more than 11,000 women and with them, over 17,000 children.  

In one week the team raised just under $800 - and there is still time to donate. Simply click on the button below to be taken to the Guymer Bailey fundraising page. 

MARY CAIRNCROSS | REALISING OUR VISION

MARY CAIRNCROSS | REALISING OUR VISION

We are looking back on our original concept for the redevelopment of the Mary Cairncross Scenic Reserve Discovery Centre. 

CYCLE OF GIVING 2018

Raising fund for medical research, yesterday cyclists from Guymer Bailey Architects took part in the annual Cycle of Giving charity ride.

Passionate about supporting the community that supports us, and fostering a culture of sustainability and philanthropy through our organisation, Guymer Bailey supports many charities and community events throughout the year.

Team Guymer Bailey cycling towards the finish line

Team Guymer Bailey cycling towards the finish line

Pictured above, cyclists from Guymer Bailey Architects took part in the annual Cycle of Giving ride (100km), to raise funds for organ transplant research and awareness for organ donation.

At any one time, there are about 1500 Australians waiting for an organ or tissue donation to save their lives. Without medical research finding better ways to source, match and transplant organs, this list is only going to get bigger. The money that is raised for the 2018 Cycle of Giving goes towards key research organ transplant projects at The Prince Charles Hospital.

This was the fifth year that Guymer Bailey took part in the cycle - a cause very close to our hearts as we have seen first hand how Organ Donation can transform a persons life. 

Although the cycle is over, we will still be fundraising for the next couple of weeks, with every dollar making a difference. 


To find out more about the medical research at The Prince Charles Hospital - https://www.cycleofgiving.org.au/champion/2018/page?articleid=170

To find out more about Organ and Tissue Donation in Australia - https://register.donatelife.gov.au/

To learn more about the charities Guymer Bailey supports - https://www.guymerbailey.com.au/corporate-responsibility